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Understanding RN Licensing Requirements

Majority of workers in today’s health care industry are made up of registered nurses (RN). They hold a senior position over nursing assistants and licensed practical nurses. Although their income may be influenced by experience, education, and location, they have more advancement opportunities and increase in salary because they have more responsibilities.

The foundation of your career in the health care field is a degree in RN. You can acquire credentials when you complete one of these programs that are usually offered at plenty of RN nursing schools:

  • Nursing diploma
  • BSN degree (Bachelor of Science in Nursing)
  • ADN degree (Associate of Science in Nursing)

The most popular program here is the associate’s degree, which typically takes about two-to-three-years of education. When you follow this path, one of your perks would be the chance to immediately apply for any entry-level position with benefits – including college credit towards your bachelor’s degree and tuition reimbursement. Also, this choice may provide hands-on experience right away – if you go straight to a bachelor’s program, it would take you four years while a nursing diploma can take you three-five years to finish.

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When you finally completed any program, you need to pass NCLEX-RN, which is a national licensing examination for nurses. The requirements vary depending on your state, so make sure that you contact your own State Board of Nursing. However, there are minimum requirements for both licensed practical nurse (LPN) and registered nurse (RN). According to National Council State Boards of Nursing, a candidate must fulfill these qualifications:

  • You must be a graduate of any state-approved nursing program. Otherwise, eligibility for graduation and verification of completion can also be accepted.
  • You must be an NCLEX examination passer.
  • You must provide an honest self-report on any chemical dependencies, criminal convictions, and functional ability deficits.

Once you accomplish these requirements as well the specific qualifications in you state, you may now obtain your RN license and apply for a full-time work position. When you’ve earned credentials as an RN, it could open the door for a more specialized and higher medical profession. Embrace this rare opportunity and move forward to a rewarding career as you become one of the registered nurses of the next generation.